US Arms Industry Dead: World Bought American Weapons, Stole the Technology + Les USA utilisent encore des disquettes pour contrôler leurs bombardiers et missiles balistiques - MIRASTNEWS
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US Arms Industry Dead: World Bought American Weapons, Stole the Technology + Les USA utilisent encore des disquettes pour contrôler leurs bombardiers et missiles balistiques

Publié par Jean de Dieu MOSSINGUE sur 26 Mai 2016, 16:55pm

US Arms Industry Dead: World Bought American Weapons, Stole the Technology

© Flickr/ Morning Calm Weekly Newspaper Installation Management Command, U.S. Army

© Flickr/ Morning Calm Weekly Newspaper Installation Management Command, U.S. Army

The expansion of American arms exports leaves the military-industrial complex at risk of being overtaken by countries who scooped up defense secrets without the cost of research and development.

On Tuesday, US defense industry analysts offered a report claiming that American military contractors will be overtaken in coming years by defense contractors in Israel, South Korea, and Brazil, marking an end to Western dominance over war profiteering.

The report, "Dynamics of International Military Modernization 2016," authored by Daniel Yoon and Doug Berenson from Beltway consultants Avascent blamed American military exports for the market threat, as countries buy arms at a cut rate to back-engineer US weapons technology.

"In many cases, these emerging players developed through diffused technology via prior export arrangements with Western suppliers, often through offset requirements and domestic industry participation," stated the report. In layman’s terms, foreign countries purchase US arms to steal American know-how, avoiding the burdensome taxpayer-subsidized cost of research and development.

The development occurs as the US military-industrial complex has shifted its focus toward exporting weapons to tyrannical regimes throughout the world, as a means to offset reductions in the size of the American war machine following the drawdown in Iraq and Afghanistan. According to the report, "in 2010, only 17% of defense equipment manufactured in the US was exported; by 2015, that number jumped dramatically to 34%."

US weapons-manufacturing expertise has been suggested as being in decline primarily due to Washington’s reticence to engage in war, opting instead to be the Walmart of weapon retailers for the world.

The situation is exacerbated by the Obama Administration’s trigger-happy approach to sell arms, often including troubling "offset requirements" making it easier for the nascent domestic defense industries of countries to "absorb suppliers' technical expertise."

In addition to the rapid growth of weapons manufacturing expertise in Israel, South Korea, and Brazil, the US contends with other leading arms exporters, including Russia and China, who offer high-end military technology. Analysts also suggest that the American military-industrial complex will soon forfeit market share to other nations, including Japan and India.

The report claimed that Israel may soon become the world’s premier supplier of radar, missile, and drone technology, noting that the country’s unmanned aerial vehicles are competitive with US hardware.

South Korea looks to make its mark in air superiority with the development of an indigenous fighter jet and a next generation T-50 design. In addition to the aerospace field, South Korea excels in the production of destroyers, frigates, amphibious assault vehicles, and assault submarines, the report said.

Brazil, by contrast, looked to occupy the lower-tech echelons of the market, at a cut-rate price exploiting a niche in light attack aircraft thanks to a partnership with Saab to produce the Gripen fighter.

American military superiority is thought to be endangered by the growing export of defense technology throughout the world, leading some analysts to worry about the future of the US weapons industry, and the safety and security of the country.


http://sputniknews.com/news/20160526/1040261112/obama-lockheed-boeing-defense-trade.html#ixzz49mIkn18u

Les USA utilisent encore des disquettes pour contrôler leurs bombardiers et missiles balistiques

© Wikipédia

© Wikipédia

Les trois quart du budget IT des agences fédérales sert plus à la maintenance qu’à la modernisation des systèmes et certaines anciennes technologies, comme les disquettes qu’utilise le Pentagone pour les missiles nucléaires, ont plus de 50 ans.

Aux États-Unis, le Bureau gouvernemental des comptes a découvert que le gouvernement américain utilisait des technologies archaïques dans des domaines pourtant vitaux. Tout est consigné dans un rapport publié le 25 mai. Il indique également que le budget alloué à la modernisation des technologies de l’information (IT) a diminué de 7,3 milliards de dollars depuis 2010 alors que les dépenses opérationnelles n’ont pas cessé d’augmenter. Sur près de 7 000 investissements IT passés en revue, la majorité (soit 5 233) n’ont pas été alloués à la modernisation des systèmes.

Le Bureau gouvernemental des comptes a même identifiée des technologies archaïques, comme les disquettes de 8 pouces, utilisées par le ministère américain de la Défense pour des opérations en lien avec les forces nucléaires américaines Un système informatique dont dépendent le déploiement des missiles balistiques intercontinentaux, les bombardiers nucléaires et les avions ravitailleurs tourne sur des ordinateurs datant des 1970 qui utilisent ces disquettes. Le rapport précise toutefois que le Pentagone entend s’en débarrasser d’ici l’année prochaine.

https://francais.rt.com/international/21227-usa-utilisent-encore-disquettes-pour

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